Bears: Make bears feel unwelcome outside your home. Scare them away by making loud noises from a safe location. Contact 604.905.BEAR to help track bear activity and keep them safe. If you see a bear, keep your distance. Identify yourself by speaking in a calm tone. Back away slowly and leave the area. Do not stop your car to get a closer look at a bear. If you see a bear, please phone the British Columbia Conservation Officer Service toll free at 1-877-952-7277 or 604-905-BEAR. For general information on bears or to report a garbage or attractant concern, please email bearsmart@whistler.ca.

Cougars: Whistler is also cougar country. These large cats generally stay hidden in the landscape and away from humans. If you do encounter a cougar:

  1. Stay calm and keep the cougar in view.
  2. Pick up children immediately – children frighten easily, the noise and movements they make could provoke an attack. Back away slowly, ensuring that the animal has a clear avenue of escape. Make yourself look as large as possible. Keep the cougar in front of you at all times.
  3. Never run or turn your back on a cougar. Sudden movement may provoke an attack.
  4. Respond aggressively if a cougar shows interest or follows you. Maintain eye contact with the cougar, show your teeth and make loud noise. Arm yourself with rocks or sticks as weapons. Crouch down as little as possible when bending down to pick up things off of the ground.
  5. Fight back if a cougar attacks. Convince the cougar you are a threat and not prey. Use anything you can as a weapon. Focus your attack on the cougar’s face and eyes.
  6. If you see a cougar, please phone the British Columbia Conservation Officer Service toll free at 1-877-952-7277 or 604-905-BEAR.
BC SPCA Wildlife Support

Please contact the BC SPCA Call Centre: 1 (855) 6BC SPCA (1-855-622-7722) toll free to report animal cruelty, neglect, and animals in distress, including wildlife.

BCSPCA Animals in Distress

Please contact the BC SPCA Call Centre: 1 (855) 6BC SPCA (1-855-622-7722) toll free to report animal cruelty, neglect, and animals in distress, including wildlife.

Wildlife Emergency Response:

Please note that it is illegal to care for wild animals unless you are a licensed wildlife rehabilitation facility. Every wild animal has species-specific medical, care, and diet requirements that can not be just looked up online – please contact a professional wildlife rehabilitator for advice and speedy transfer to a licensed facility. Not sure if there is a rehabilitator near you? Call the BC SPCA Provincial Call Centre at 1-855-6BC-SPCA (1-855-622-7722) to find out where the nearest facility is and if the wild animal needs needs intervention.

Signs a wild animal is in need of help:
  1. an adult animal that can be captured easily
  2. seriously favouring a leg or wing
  3. sitting on the road, not moving for traffic
  4. bleeding
  5. having difficulty breathing or convulsing
  6. a bird sitting with its feathers puffed and not moving for a long period
  7. a bird running on the ground when others fly away

In most cases, leave baby animals alone! They only need help if they appear to be dehydrated or emaciated, have sunken eyes and dull coat, or are listless or injured. After careful observation, if you believe that the animal is in need of help call the closest wildlife rehabilitation facility before you attempt to capture it.

Wildlife Rehabilitation and Rescue Contacts
  1. For all wildlife inquires, call the BC SPCA Provincial Call Centre 1-855-6BC-SPCA (1-855-622-7722). The call centre is open seven days per week; Mon to Fri: 9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Sat & Sun: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
  2. For injured wildlife on Southern Vancouver Island, call BC SPCA Wild ARC at 250-478-9453
  3. For the rest of BC, you can also find the closest wildlife rehabilitator on the Wildlife Rehabilitators Network of BC website
  4. For outside of BC and Canada, check the wildlife rehabilitator listings on the International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council “Wildlife International” directory

Visit our Wild ARC website for more information on how to determine if a wild animal is injured or orphaned.
What to do if you find a baby animal